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Academics /

Course Catalog 2017-18

Departments

THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT [100]

The courses listed in this section comprise the four-credit Theology requirement. Senior theology will be comprised of 2 one-semester courses; seniors will choose two out of 3 courses.

SCRIPTURE AND JESUS [113]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Freshman status

Description: The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture
The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ.

Who Is Jesus Christ? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, and the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity.

MISSION AND CHURCH [125]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status

Description: The Mission of Jesus Christ (The Paschal Mystery)
The purpose of this course is to lead the students towards a deeper understanding of redemption and Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s promise of redemption. The course explores the how the suffering, death, resurrection and ascension of Christ made redemption possible. A Christology course, which looks at how Jesus the Christ is present in our lives and Church, particularly in the form of the Paschal Mystery.
Jesus Christ's Mission Continues in the Church.
The purpose of this course is to help the students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. The course explores the origin, the human and divine elements and ongoing mission of the Church.*
* Woven throughout will be the Ignatian understanding of Jesus as companion as experienced in the Spiritual Exercises.

SACRAMENT / MORALITY / JUSTICE [136]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status

Description: “What Does It Mean To Live In the Image of God?” Is the overarching question for students to consider in this course.
Sacraments: The purpose of this part of the course is to help students understand the sacramental nature of the church. Through the Church and its sacraments students will understand that they can encounter Christ today in a real way, especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ thus participating in a full sacramental life.

Morality / Justice: The student is assisted in achieving a better awareness and understanding of the nature and meaning of Christian morality, particularly within a Catholic Christian context, in order to assist him in making better and wiser moral judgments. The intention of this section of the course is to help the student to live his convictions through thought and action. Emphasis is placed on those tools necessary to make moral decisions. Building upon the student’s background in morality, the young adult is exposed to the complexities of global economic and social systems. This course provides a Christian framework for a response by introducing the Catholic Church’s call to social justice. In particular, students aim to find hope and purpose in the call to action through the traditions of the social encyclicals and Catholic Social Teaching.

CHRISTIAN RELATIONSHIPS [147]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The emphasis in this course is to pursue the meaning of the commandment "love one another" and to more fully understand the theological belief that "God is Love." Our humanness, centered on our call to love as Christ loved, is understood through our relationship to self, to others and to God. Main topics examined in this course include: self-awareness and understandings needed for human growth and maturity; recognition and exploration of the ways in which humanity may need to achieve that self-awareness and understanding, in order to live in the world as called by the Catholic Church; friendship and the physical, psychological and social differences in being male or female in a relationship, as well as the societal structures which help and hinder those differences; forms and functions of love and the totality of human sexuality as a way of being fully human in this world; the ideal and viability of the family in contemporary society; vocations as the envisioned experience of Catholic Church for living in the world and working towards building the Kingdom of God. The units that explore these themes are: The Self, Friendship, Love and Sexuality, Family, “Father”.
This class meets three times week. Semester 2 only.

INTER-RELIGIOUS DIALOGUE [167]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: “In our contemporary globalized world, where technology, environmental and other concerns challenge traditional boundaries, the Society’s mission of faith and justice and of dialogue of religions and cultures gives new meaning to the frontiers of knowledge and human encounter.” “All men and women are our concern for dialogue and for proclamation... to discover Jesus Christ where we have not noticed him before and to reveal him where he has not been seen before” (GC of the Society of Jesus).

The purpose of this course is to help the students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to non-Catholic Christians as well as to other religions of the world. The course is intended to help students to recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in non-Catholic Christian churches and ecclesial communities as well as in non-Christian religions
This class meets three times week. Semester 2 only.

Summer Description: The purpose of this course is to augment classroom learning with immersion & experiential learning through visits to religious sites and direct dialogue with members of different religions throughout our own communities. Combining traditional classroom study with experiential site visits will help the students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to non-Catholic Christians as well as to other religions of the world. The course is intended to help students recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in non-Catholic Christian churches and ecclesial communities as well as in non-Christian religions.

HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH [177]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The purpose of this course is to supply the students with a general knowledge of the Church’s history from apostolic times to the present. In this course, students will learn about the Church’s 2,000 years of history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles as well as the impact of the Church on the world today.
This class meets three times week. Semester 2 only.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE [182]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The purpose of this course is to advance students’ study of social justice and Catholic Social Teaching (CST) with a particular focus on the Environment. Students are to learn how Christ’s concern for others, is reflected in caring for God’s creation, the benefits and detriments impact on humanity, in particular the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission.
This class meets three days a week. Semester 1 only.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING: PEACE & CONFLICT [185]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

“If you want peace, work for justice.” Pope Paul VI.

Description: This course is intended to advance students’ study of social justice and Catholic Social Teaching (CST), with particular focus on the themes of Peace (making) and Conflict. Students will orient their examination in the person of Jesus Christ and his call to peace and justice in the Gospels. Students will explore how this message of social justice is advanced through the Catholic Church’s history, social thought, and doctrine. The course will guide students into an informed and thoughtful examination of historical and current events marking episodes of war and conflict and engage the learner in considering the just social and economic conditions that may help prevent and reconcile the effects of war and conflict in our world.
This class meets three days a week. Semester 1 only.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING: ECONOMIC JUSTICE [187]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: "As followers of Jesus Christ and participants in a powerful economy, Catholics in the United States are called to work for greater economic justice in the face of persistent poverty, growing income-gaps, and increasing discussion of economic issues in the United States and around the world." United States Conferences of Catholic Bishops, 1996
This one semester senior elective provides an introduction to the main principles of Catholic Social Teachings (CST). It attempts to explore through discussion the official teaching of the church and historical trends that have shaped CST. The central focus will be on issues concerning economic justice, with a particular focus on the Church's teaching concerning the "preferential option for the poor." In a statement published by the USCCB in 1996, they suggest that the moral measure for a healthy economy depends primarily on how its poor are faring. It is in that spirit that this course will challenge students to evaluate economic success through a communal lens with concern for the mutual well-being of all members of society.
This class meets three days a week. Semester 1 only.

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT [200]

Four credits of English are required for graduation.

Criteria for English Pre-AP and AP Courses

Upperclassmen requesting Pre-AP or AP English courses must qualify according to the following criteria as established by the English Department:

To be considered as a potential candidate for Pre-AP or AP English, each student must have achieved, in both semesters an average of 80 in his present Pre-AP or AP English class or an average of 93 in his present regular English class. Students not meeting these criteria may be placed in Pre-AP or AP English based on extenuating circumstances as presented by the instructor in consultation with the Department Chair and Assistant Principal of Student Academics.

Recommendation of previous English teachers will be considered.

Each student wishing to move from a regular English class to a Pre-AP or AP class will be required to sit for a writing examination. The department will announce the times for these exams; a team of English instructors will evaluate these exams.

Students not maintaining an average above 80 in a Pre-AP or AP English class may be transferred to a regular section at the end of the first semester.

An application process is required for admission into Honors English Seminar. See the instructor for this course or your guidance counselor for an application, including deadlines.

PRE-AP ENGLISH 1 [211]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Freshmen students will be ranked in order of their scores on the Verbal Aptitude and Reading Comprehension portions of the entrance examination. Additionally, the department will evaluate the writing samples from the entrance examination. Class size may limit availability.

Description: This is a foundation-building course. The course is also reading and writing intensive. There is a review of grammar rules and usage problems. Students are asked to apply what they learn in the grammar review to their own writing. They read short stories, essays, novels, plays, and poetry. From classic works of literature to contemporary novels, all the genres are covered over the course of the school year. Students are asked to discuss the literature and to write and revise critical essays over the works read. Students write different types of paragraphs, essays, critical papers, and poems.

ENGLISH 1 [212]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Freshman status

Description: This is a foundation-building course. There are three main areas of study: grammar, literature, and composition. There is a comprehensive review of grammar on the freshman level. Students are quizzed over grammatical rules and are asked to apply usage rules to their writing. Students read many works of literature, covering all the genres. Students read short stories, several novels, essays, plays, and poems. Sentence structure and paragraph development are the primary focus of the students’ writing. Besides writing different types of paragraphs, students write essays and critical papers over what they read. Creative writing is also covered through journals and poetry.

PRE-AP ENGLISH 2 [223]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status. Qualification based on the Departmental criteria.

Description: In addition to the material covered in English 2, Pre-AP English 2 continues the work begun in Pre-AP English 1. Close reading and writing assignments are more rigorous and students concentrate on American literary themes.

ENGLISH 2 [224]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status

Description: Sophomore English presents a survey of American Literature from its roots to the second half of the 20th century. The course is designed to help the student read more deeply and richly, with greater insight and understanding, see connections between works, draw appropriate conclusions, strengthen critical thinking skills, formulate and support a thesis, and gain an understanding of what constitutes the American experience.

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION [235]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status. Qualification based on the Departmental criteria.

Description: This course follows the theoretical structure of English 3. Supplemental readings include established literary classics, which provide students an opportunity to read texts closely, examining how diction, imagery, details, language, and sentence structure affect meaning and tone. Students work throughout the year mastering these skills of literary argument both in oral form and in written form. Written work primarily includes demonstrating mastery of the literary argument, positing a sophisticated thesis for one thousand to two thousand word essays. By May, the student should be prepared to succeed on the AP Literature & Composition exam. This course will include a summer reading/writing assignment.

ENGLISH 3 [236]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status

Description: Junior English explores the major literary works and periods of British literature: Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare, Romantic Age, and Victorian Age. Supplementary texts are often assigned, for example, Great Expectations, Lord of the Flies, The Tempest, The Power of One, and Frankenstein. Class discussion encourages students to identify the larger patterns of epic, tragedy, comedy, and lyric. In addition, students concurrently develop analytical writing skills, primarily positing a literary thesis and defending it in an organized essay with well-elaborated, coherent paragraphs. Writing topics are literary and at times incorporate secondary research material. Moreover, the study of grammar is used as a means to improve and comment on writing style and sentence structure, exploring a more sophisticated understanding and use of language.

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION [247]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Senior status. Qualification based on the Departmental criteria.

Description: This course prepares students to take the College Board’s AP Language and Composition exam.
The course content examines the rhetorical strategies used to communicate some of the central philosophical ideas of Western culture; we will explore this thinking primarily through the reading of the nonfiction essay, but also investigate some forms of fiction—drama, short story, and poetry.
Writing assignments focus on the close reading of texts and communicating how those texts produce ideas.

Course Objectives:
• To heighten the student’s awareness of how the most sophisticated syntax of the English language work so that they can incorporate these patterns into their own prose;
• To advance the student’s knowledge of sophisticated English vocabulary;
• To expose the persuasive techniques of the most effective essayists and orators so that the student can recognize how individuals shape ideas and influence others and Western culture;
• To refine writing skills that can aptly communicate the ideas of others and to provide persuasive critiques of their concepts.
This class meets M, T, Th and an occasional Friday.

HONORS ENGLISH SEMINAR [257]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Senior status. An application is required for admission into Honors English Seminar. See the Seminar instructor or your guidance counselor for an application. Note deadlines. Qualification based on Departmental criteria. The Seminar student must be available for attending a few lectures, presentations and performances outside of class time.

Description: The Honors Senior English Seminar is concerned with creative growth and is based on the assumption that the act of thinking and creating makes living enjoyable and worthwhile. The Seminar encourages the student to recognize his individual viewpoint and to value the process of his own intellectual growth. The teacher serves as a guide and resource for those engaged in discussing and grappling with the complex issues of their culture in a spirit of collaboration. The course is concerned with examining significant works of contemporary literature and other art forms. In addition, the student presents a Seminar Project at the end of the year, one that has engaged his interest and concentration for several months.
This class meets three days a week.

ENGLISH 4

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: Senior English combines the study of rhetoric and literature. Students read and write essays to master various structural forms and methods of argumentation. Students are exposed to a variety of rhetorical methods of composition and are taught the distinct difference between composition and revision. Literary analysis includes both classical and contemporary works. The specific purpose of Senior English is to prepare students to succeed in English 101 and 102 at the university level and we employ college level textbooks and materials.

Students must select one of the options below for second semester.
This class meets four days a week.

Senior English Options (Choose 1)

MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE [255]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: English 4 [248]
Review of various genres exploring literary contributions in the United States after 1945.
This class meets four days a week.

LITERATURE OF THE SOUTHWEST [252]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: English 4 [248]
Study of historically significant literature emerging out of the southwest region of the United States.
This class meets four days a week.

NON-FICTION [253]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: English 4 [248]
Study of culturally or historically significant literature such as memoir and autobiography, essay, history, biography, speeches.
This class meets four days a week.

MODERN NON-WESTERN LITERATURE [254]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: English 4 [248]
Contemporary pieces from regions such as Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America.
This class meets four days a week.

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LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT [300]

Three full credits of the same Language are required for graduation.

LATIN 1 [312]

Credit: 1.00

Description: The first Latin course provides students with a solid grounding in Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. They will use this knowledge to read simple Latin texts about Roman life, history and mythology. Students will broaden their English vocabulary and deepen their understanding of both the Latin and English languages. They will also gain an understanding of Classical civilization that will enrich their knowledge of literature, history, philosophy, theology, and art.

LATIN 2 [314]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Latin 1

Description: Latin 2 begins with a thorough review of material from Latin 1. The Latin 2 course is designed around Latin readings that continue to introduce students to vocabulary, grammar and Roman culture, history, and mythology. Students will expand their vocabulary and begin to learn more complex grammar. All students will be expected to come prepared to memorize the material that is required to read and write Latin sentences.

HONORS LATIN 2 [313]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in Latin 1 plus teacher recommendation.

Description: Honors Latin 2 requires diligence, organization, attention to detail, and exemplary study skills as we delve into complex variations of the Latin language and its usages. Honors Latin 2 begins with a thorough review of material from Latin 1. The Honors Latin 2 course is designed around Latin readings that continue to introduce students to vocabulary, grammar and Roman culture, history, and mythology. Students will expand their vocabulary and begin to learn more complex and detailed grammar. All students will be expected to come prepared to memorize the material that is required to read and write Latin sentences.

LATIN 3 [316]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Latin 2

Description: Students in Latin 3 will continuously reinforce previously acquired syntax, grammar, and vocabulary as they become familiar with Latin literature. Latin 3 begins with a thorough review of material from Latin 2 followed up with additional grammar lessons concerning complex sentence forms and structures.

HONORS LATIN 3 [315]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 85 or higher Honors Latin 2 plus teacher recommendation required. Please note that Moving from Latin 2 (314) to Honors Latin 3 is very difficult because of material covered in Honors Latin 2 that is not taught in Latin 2 (regular).

Description: Honors Latin 3 requires diligence, organization, attention to detail, and exemplary study skills as the class delves into complex variations of the Latin language and its usages. Honors Latin 3 begins with a thorough review of material from Honors Latin 2 followed up with additional grammar lessons concerning complex sentence forms and structures. Short readings from authentic classical Latin texts will be introduced in the second semester.

HONORS LATIN 4 [317]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 85 or higher in Honors Latin 3 plus teacher recommendation.

Description: Honors Latin 4 is an advanced course given over completely to reading and studying ancient Roman authors and their culture through their literature. Students who enroll in Latin 4 will have a strong grasp of the Latin language, having already studied Latin for at least three years. In this course, students will read and analyze Latin texts such as Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s De Bello Gallico.

SPANISH 1 [320]

Credit: 1.00

Description: This course is for students who have had little to no formal instruction in Spanish. Emphasis is on building everyday vocabulary while the student is introduced to basic grammar and sentence structures. During the second half of the course the students expand their vocabulary and grammar through listening, speaking, reading, and writing exercises. Cultural topics include holidays, food, family and conventional greetings. Emphasis is placed on oral production and comprehension of common vocabulary in everyday situations.

SPANISH 2 [324]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or qualifying grade on placement exam

Description: Spanish 2 begins with a thorough review of material from Spanish 1 and the integration of this vocabulary and grammar within more involved speaking, reading, writing and listening activities. New vocabulary is combined with an in-depth look at both past tenses as well as commands and the present subjunctive. Vocabulary includes health and medical conditions, technology, cars and driving, the house, household chores, nature, the environment, recycling, conservation. Emphasis is placed on oral and written production and comprehension, with students producing written dialogues, paragraphs and projects.

HONORS SPANISH 2 [323]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in Spanish 1 plus teacher recommendation or qualifying grade on placement exam

Description: The curriculum of Honors Spanish 2 covers much the same vocabulary and grammar as Spanish 2, but at a deeper level. Projects may include skits, student-made videos and creative stories over a variety of topics. Cultural studies include investigation into realms within the Hispanic culture and that of Spanish speaking countries. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated. Students who aspire to take AP Spanish later in their Jesuit career should enroll in this class if they meet the grade requirements.

SPANISH 3 [326]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Spanish 2

Description: The Spanish 3 student is on the threshold of holding spontaneous conversations using everyday vocabulary. The year begins with a thorough review of previously learned grammar. Students talk about real, hypothetical and future actions with globally-themed vocabulary as they encounter new grammar structures. Historical and cultural topics are also integrated into the course.

HONORS SPANISH 3 [325]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 88 or higher in Honors Spanish 2 or an average of 93 or higher in Spanish 2 plus teacher recommendation.

Description: In Honors Spanish 3 much of the class is conducted in Spanish. As this is a preparatory course for AP Spanish, students should be prepared to study challenging grammar points in detail, as well as discuss more global themes. The approach will be quantitatively more intense in terms of grammar skills, speaking, reading, and listening skills. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated.

HONORS SPANISH 3 HERITAGE LEARNER [331]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Recommended for Spanish heritage/bilingual students who would benefit from additional instruction of grammar and writing skills. Such Spanish heritage-leaner students have taken one of the Spanish 2 courses or are incoming students with intermediate to high Spanish listening and speaking skills and knowledge of Spanish vocabulary.

Description: This class is offered for students who are heritage or native speakers. A heritage student comes from a home where Spanish is predominantly used and has therefore learned language skills at home or outside of school. This curriculum of this course closely mirrors that of Honors Spanish 3, but this class dedicates extra attention to writing skills, spelling, and how to handle conversations outside of classroom. Course content includes: essential reading, everyday conversations, pronunciation/dictation skills, analysis of grammar, writing skills, ability to express opinions and hold advanced conversations in Spanish. Culture and traditions will be studied through film, media, projects, dialogues.

SPANISH 4 [328]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Spanish 3

Description: Conducted primarily in Spanish. Review of grammar with emphasis on complex structures, exceptions and idioms. While vocabulary topics will include many of the same areas as Spanish 4, the class will also include discussion of current events, spontaneous conversations and development of advanced speech patterns. Students will read short stories and utilize Spanish sites on the Internet in preparation for discussion. Many of the activities mirror the format of the AP Spanish Language and Culture class, thus it is good preparation for AP Spanish the following year. This class is not for Heritage speakers of Spanish.
This class meets four days a week.

HONORS SPANISH 4 [329]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 88 or higher in Spanish 3 Honors and recommendation from Spanish 3 teacher.

Description: Conducted primarily in Spanish. Review of grammar with emphasis on complex structures, exceptions and idioms. While vocabulary topics will include many of the same areas as Spanish 4, the class will also include discussion of current events, spontaneous conversations and development of advanced speech patterns. Students will read and research from Spanish sites on the Internet in preparation for discussion. This class is not for Heritage speakers of Spanish. 
This class meets four days a week.

HONORS SPANISH 4 HERITAGE LEARNER [342]

Credit: 1.00
Recommended for Spanish heritage/bilingual students who would benefit from additional instruction of grammar and writing skills. Such Spanish heritage-leaner students have taken one of the Honors Spanish 3 or Heritage Learner Honors Spanish 3 courses.

Description: This class is offered for students who are heritage or native speakers. A heritage student comes from a home where Spanish is predominantly used and has therefore learned language skills at home or outside of school. This curriculum of this course closely mirrors that of Honors Spanish 4, but this class dedicates extra attention to writing skills, spelling, and reading and reflection on various topics that are included on the AP Spanish exam. Course content includes: essential reading, everyday conversations, pronunciation/dictation skills, analysis of grammar, writing skills, ability to express opinions and hold advanced conversations in Spanish. Cultural traditions will be studied through film, media, projects, dialogues.
This class meets four days a week.

AP SPANISH-LANGUAGE [327]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 85 or higher in one of the Honors Spanish 3 or Honors Spanish 4 classes. An interview and recommendation by the AP instructor may also be required.

Description: The Advanced Placement Spanish Language course emphasizes the use of language for active communication. As such, the class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish as students and instructor communicate with one another. The course objectives are: 1) the ability to understand spoken Spanish in various contexts, 2) the continued development of an ample Spanish vocabulary, especially as it relates to the six themes of the course, and 3) the ability to express oneself in Spanish both in speech and in writing, coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency and accuracy. Many class activities will be designed to practice the AP Spanish test format, with additional lessons and units involving poetry and Spanish short stories.
This class meets four days a week.

FRENCH 1 [332]

Credit: 1.00

Description: This course is for students who have had little or no formal instruction in French. Emphasis is on building everyday vocabulary through significant reading and oral production, as well as formation of correct pronunciation habits and phonetics. In addition to grammar and vocabulary concepts, students are introduced to the culture of the francophone community. As the year progresses, students expand their knowledge through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities.

FRENCH 2 [334]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: French 1

Description: During the French 2 year, there is significant vocabulary expansion, as well as presentation of major grammatical concepts (past, future, conditional tenses). Students build their knowledge through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. Emphasis continues to be placed on oral production and comprehension with students producing written dialogues and projects.

HONORS FRENCH 2 [333]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in French 1 plus teacher recommendation

Description: The curriculum of Honors French 2 will be essentially identical with that of French 2. There will be additional projects, presentations, and in-class discussions that will further develop the students’ language skills. The approach will be qualitatively more intense in terms of grammar skills, speaking, reading and listening skills. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated.

FRENCH 3 [336]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: French 2

Description: The French 3 student is on the threshold of holding spontaneous conversations using everyday vocabulary. The review of previously-learned grammar concepts is combined with exceptions, details and new vocabulary to produce longer oral and written discourses. Students learn to talk about real life situations in present, past and future actions, as well as the history, art, current events and geography of France and French speaking countries. Students build their knowledge through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. Emphasis continues to be placed on oral production and comprehension, with students producing written dialogues and projects.

HONORS FRENCH 3 [335]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 85 or higher in Honors French 2 or an average of 90 or higher in French 2 plus teacher recommendation in both.

Description: The curriculum of Honors French 3 will be similar to that of French 3, but with additional projects presentations, and in-class discussions to develop the students’ language ability. The approach will be qualitatively more intense, in terms of grammar skills, speaking, reading and listening skills. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated.

PRE-AP FRENCH [337]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An “A” average in Honors French 2 and an interview and recommendation by the AP instructor.

Description: See AP French [338]
This class meets four days a week.

AP FRENCH [338]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Pre AP French or teacher recommendation.

Description: AP French Language and Culture is designed to train students in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational aspects of communication. The six themes of the AP French Language and Culture course are: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. This course is designed to increase the fluency and level of sophistication with which students express themselves in French, and develops their ability to understand the language and the cultures of the French-speaking world. The class is conducted in French and students must express themselves in French. This course includes advanced grammar topics, practice in narrative and expository writing, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and extemporaneous speaking. Students analyze, reflect on, and discuss contemporary issues. They read Francophone literature through the centuries, and write essays and reviews. They study Francophone culture and history. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture examination, which they take at the end of the year.
This class meets four days a week.

MANDARIN 1 [361]

Credit: 1.00
Description: This course is for students who have had little to no prior experience studying Mandarin Chinese. Students will learn the pinyin Romanization system and may elect to read and write either traditional or simplified characters. Emphasis is on building everyday vocabulary while students are introduced to basic grammar and sentence structures. Cultural topics include family, food, history, current affairs, and film.

MANDARIN 2 [363]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Mandarin 1

Description: Mandarin 2 begins with a thorough review of material from Mandarin 1 and the integration of this vocabulary and grammar within more involved speaking, reading, writing and listening activities. Students will continue to build their knowledge of Chinese culture and history through a variety of projects and activities. Emphasis continues to be placed on written and oral production with students producing dialogues and projects.

HONORS MANDARIN 2 [362]

Credit: 1.00

Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in Mandarin 1 plus teacher recommendation.
Description: The curriculum of Honors Mandarin 2 will be essentially identical with that of Mandarin 2, but with additional projects, presentations, and assignments to develop the students’ language ability. The approach will be qualitatively more intense, in terms of grammar skills, speaking, reading and listening skills. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated; some preparation for AP Test skills.

MANDARIN 3 [365]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Mandarin 2

Description: The curriculum of Mandarin 3 will continue to develop students grammar skills, listening, reading, and speaking abilities through projects, presentations, and assignments. Students will continue to develop their ability to use the internet to navigate the Mandarin-speaking internet, and will be expected to spend more time engaging with authentic materials independently outside of class. Culture will continue to be an integral part of the course, with increasing opportunities for students to tailor activities and presentations to their own interests.

HONORS MANDARIN 3 [364]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in Honors Mandarin 2 plus teacher recommendation.

Description: The curriculum of Honors Mandarin 3 will be essentially identical with that of Mandarin 3, but with additional projects, presentations, and assignments to develop the students’ language ability. The approach will be qualitatively more intense, in terms of grammar skills, speaking, reading and listening skills. The expectations of the teacher will be heightened and the progress accelerated; preparation for AP Test skills.

PRE-AP MANDARIN 4 [366]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: An average of 90 or higher in Honors Mandarin 3 plus teacher recommendation.

Description: The curriculum of Mandarin 4 will continue to develop students’ grammar skills, listening, reading, and speaking abilities through projects, presentations, and assignments. Extra emphasis will be placed on clearly communicating in the target language while navigating real-life tasks that arise when studying or travelling in a Mandarin-speaking country. Studying authentic materials and requiring the usage of the target language to navigate the Mandarin-speaking internet will compose a large component of the course. Additionally, this course will begin to familiarize students with the tasks and skill required for AP Testing.

AP MANDARIN 4 [366]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisite: Pre-AP Mandarin or teacher recommendation.

Description: The Advanced Placement Mandarin Chinese Language course emphasizes the use of language for active communication. The course objectives are: 1) the ability to understand spoken Mandarin in various contexts, 2) the ability to express oneself in Mandarin both in speech and in writing, coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency and accuracy. Many class activities will be designed to practice the AP Mandarin test format. The course content will reflect intellectual interests shared by the students and the teacher (arts, current events, literature, sports, etc.) Materials will include audio and video recordings, films, newspapers, and magazines.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT [400]

The 1.0 credit Physical Education requirement is earned during the freshman year.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION [various 400 courses]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: None.

Description: Physical Education is a Pass/Fail course. Students are allowed to participate in a wide variety of activities with an emphasis on fun, movement and stress release. Once a year all students are administered the President’s Physical Fitness Test. This testing allows the instructor to evaluate the student in comparison to other students on the national level. Student progress may be charted from year to year.
This class meets four days a week.

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SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT [500]

The four credit Social Studies requirements are World History, United States History, Social Justice and Public Policy, Government, Economics and one additional half credit (0.50) Social Studies choice course. In addition to the four Social Studies credits, all students are required the half credit (0.50) in Rhetoric and Civics.

RHETORIC AND CIVICS [519]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Freshman status

Description: Rhetoric and Civics is a semester course designed to foster critical thinking. The course will focus on introducing students to the prevalence of argument in modern society (i.e. relationships, politics, law, media), the argument process, and the creations of argument. The course will introduce students to types of evidence, reasoning devices, research skills, organizational skills, and critical analysis. The course will use diverse methods to practice and develop these skills including argumentative essays, presentations, and debates.
This class meets four days a week.

AP WORLD HISTORY [513]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status; Qualification based on the following AP placement criteria: Students selecting AP World History must have achieved an overall GPA of 88 with a minimum Social Studies (Argumentation and Debate) GPA of 90; minimum Freshmen level English GPA of 90.

An evaluation on a rating scale from the freshmen English and Social Studies teachers will be obtained. To be ranked, a student must have an average teacher assessment of four or higher (on a five point scale); The selection factor on which students will be ranked is a combination of GPA and teacher recommendation ratings.
Students taking AP World History understand they are agreeing to take the AP test administered in the Spring.

Description: AP World History is a survey course that follows the overall scope, sequence and format of the College Board’s AP World History Course Description in preparing students for the AP World History Exam. The course is designed to foster critical thinking skills and habits of mind as students analyze the changes and continuities of human civilization across time and place. It seeks to look at the broad development of humanity at a more global level, and it focuses on many cultures and societies outsides those usually considered part of “Western Civilization”. The course assumes students are highly motivated with excellent reading and study habits and that they are willing to accept the challenges of a “college-level” course as high school sophomores.

WORLD HISTORY [514]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status

Description: This is a two semester survey of World History that follows the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the present with slightly more focus on Western Civilization. Students will explore how human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have influenced life in these civilizations. Students will also focus on major changes in World History such as the development of agriculture, rise of the nation states, the industrial era, spread of democracy and the issues and conflicts of the 20th century.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY [524]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status; Qualification based on the following AP placement criteria: Students selecting AP U.S. History must have achieved an overall GPA of 88 with a minimum cumulative Social Studies GPA of 90.

An evaluation on a rating scale from the sophomore English and Social Studies teachers will be obtained. To be ranked, a student must have an average teacher assessment of four or higher (on a five point scale); the selection factor on which students will be ranked is a combination of GPA and teacher recommendation ratings. Students taking AP US History understand they are agreeing to take the AP test administered in the Spring.

Description: This course is structured to prepare students to achieve the greatest possible success on the AP U.S. History Exam in the Spring. This course is a survey in United States history from the early days of exploration to the USA‘s postwar superpower status. Its purpose is to help students gain insight and demonstrate an appreciation for the American phenomenon both internationally and domestically. Emphasis is placed on the historical, social, political, economic and intellectual issues, and how they relate to the maturation and development of the country. Success in this course will require students to integrate and apply knowledge gained from the synthesis of thorough lecture notes, participating in class discussion, completing all assigned activities, text readings and outside readings; independent initiative, motivation and dedication to academic success are assumed.

UNITED STATES HISTORY [526]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status

Description: This is a two semester survey of United States history from its New World beginning through the major events of the twentieth century and into the twenty first. Students will investigate the United States‘ struggle to define and practice its democratic ideals throughout its development and refinement. Students are required to write a major research paper and make use of interpretive and analytical skills.

AP GOVERNMENT [537]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; completion of World and U.S. History. Qualification based on the following AP placement criteria: Students selecting AP Government and AP Economics must have achieved an overall GPA of 88 with a minimum cumulative Social Studies GPA of 90; an evaluation on a rating scale from the junior English and Social Studies teachers will be obtained. To be ranked, a student must have an average teacher assessment of four or higher (on a five point scale); the selection factor on which students will be ranked is a combination of GPA data and teacher recommendation ratings. Students taking AP Government understand they are agreeing to take the AP test administered in the Spring.

Description: This one semester college level course in United States government and politics brings critical perspective to the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Through lecture, discussion, original source readings, focused research, and simulations, the course allows students to understand and appreciate the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the United States’ political reality. The AP course is designed to aid the student to achieve the greatest possible success on the AP Government examination.
This class meets four days a week.

GOVERNMENT [538]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; completion of World and US History.

Description: This one semester course in Government introduces students to the structure and function of the American governmental system along with the nature of American politics. An investigation of the Constitution and its development opens the way to focus on how various governmental officials achieve and wield power. Campaigning and elections, policy making, and the media‘s role in politics are given explicit attention. How the three branches of the national government work together through balance of power and the checks and balances system, how the Congress makes law, the President executes law and the courts review law are all investigated thoroughly to enlighten students about the American government‘s responsibility to citizens and their own social and civic responsibility.
This class meets four days a week.
** An accelerated version of this course is offered during Summer Session to rising Seniors.

GOVERNMENT CLOSE UP TRIP TO DC [539] (Summer Only)

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; completion of World and US History.

Description: This three week accelerated Summer Government course introduces students to the structure and function of the American governmental system along with the nature of American politics. During Week One and Two students meet in the classroom at Jesuit and investigate the Constitution, how the three branches of the national government operate and work together, campaigning, elections, and policy making. Week Three students travel to Washington DC as members of the Close Up flagship High School Program. Visit www.closeup.org to become more familiar with this one-of-a-kind opportunity for students to experience their government in action. This accelerated Summer Session course requires students to integrate and apply knowledge gained from the synthesis of text readings, ancillary readings, class and travel experiences and independent initiative. Additional tuition and fees required.
Number of students is limited.

AP MACROECONOMICS [547]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; completion of World and U.S. History. Qualification based on the Departmental AP placement criteria as stated for AP Government.

Description: This one semester college level course is an analysis of the economy as a whole. Students examine the organization and function of the economy through lectures, readings, and focused research projects demanding evaluation and synthesis. Topics covered include money and banking, national income, public finance, and international linkages. The AP course is designed to aid the student to achieve the greatest possible success on the AP Macroeconomics examination.
This class meets four days a week.

ECONOMICS [548]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; completion of World and U.S. History.

Description: This one semester course is taken in the senior year. Through lecture, discussion, research project, evaluative activities and diagnostics, and student presentations, students demonstrate mastery of essential economic concepts such as the operation of markets, national income, and money and banking. Special consideration is given to an extension of socio-economic issues and social justice issues.
This class meets four days a week.
** An accelerated version of this course is offered during Summer Session to rising Seniors.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SOCIAL STUDIES [558]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This is a one semester senior level elective designed to explore today‘s issues and conflicts, particularly at the national level. It is a self-directed participatory course with seminar style discussions and debates. Use is made of current articles, events, documentaries, videos, and other pertinent information.
This class meets four days a week.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY [562]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. The aim of an AP course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory human geography courses.
This class meets four days a week.

SUSTAINABILITY & COLLAPSE OF CIVILIZATIONS [570]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status.

Description: This one semester elective course investigates the history of sustainability in human civilizations. It seeks to explore why societies fail and how they succeed, while helping students become more informed of the current sustainability issues facing the United States and the world at large. The material is presented seminar-style, and it uses the book Collapse by Pulitzer-prize winning author Jared Diamond as its core text.
This class meets four days a week.

AP PSYCHOLOGY [573]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. In particular, the AP Psychology course seeks four primary goals: give students a working knowledge of the theories and key concepts of each of the major sub-fields within psychology; expose them to many of the contributing psychologists and significant research studies, both historical and current, that have shaped our understanding of behavior and mental processes; train them to apply psychological principles and understand connections between ideas and theories; and leave them with an appreciation of the scientific methods and ethical procedures that produce such knowledge.
This class meets four days a week.

PSYCHOLOGY [571]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester elective course will teach students to apply approaches such as the cognitive, behavioral, biological, psychoanalytic, and humanistic theories to examine people and their responses to the world. Students will also examine topics such as motivation, emotion, theories of learning, definitions of abnormality, psychological disorders, and approaches to treatment. Additional areas to be covered include social psychology, group dynamics, conformity, theories of personality, and career opportunities in the field of psychology.
This class meets four days a week.

HISTORY THROUGH POPULAR MEDIA [572]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester elective course is interested in the fact that many people in current US society get their history through media outside of print. That is, they do not read history so much as view it or play it. History comes to them in an ubiquitous flood of Hollywood films, History Channel docu-wars, evening broadcasts, and video games. Thus, a question arises: how valid are these media for conveying the past? Even more specifically, what about history, if anything, can be legitimately learned from such media? How reliable are these sources and by what criteria should such sources be scrutinized, criticized, and evaluated in terms of conveying the past to the present and future? This course is for students interested in the way alternative media, particularly film, conveys history. Students can expect to develop critical thinking and writing skills, as well as some sense of the larger controversies surrounding how the past can and should be communicated.
This class meets four days a week.

HISTORICAL CONCEPT OF WAR: THEORY, PRACTICE AND APPLICATIONS [580]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester course examines the concept of war from several historical perspectives. First, students will examine “Just War Theory” to understand the arguments for war as a moral, or immoral, exercise of organized violence to achieve political ends. The course will then present different approaches to strategy, stressing Clausewitz‘s principles of war as outlined in Das Krieg, Machiavelli‘s The Prince, and U.S. Army Field Manual 100-5. The instructor will present an analysis of a specific war, applying the concepts of just war and military strategy. Students will then, in groups, produce a similar analysis of a war, and present that analysis to the class. Students must be prepared for this extensive group work and group presentation, as a major part of the course grade will be derived from this work.
This class meets four days a week.

MASS MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES [582]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester senior level course will introduce students to cultural and mass media studies. The course will emphasize the processes, elements, uses, and impacts of mass media including history, development, operation, and cultural effects of all types of mass media including books, newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, sound recordings, computer media, and internet based media. The course will introduce students to various forms of cultural and media criticism methods including describing, interpreting, and judging media messages utilizing various critical theories. The curriculum is designed to develop students writing, critical thinking, speaking, and research skills in the context of mass media studies.
This class meets four days a week.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS [557]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: International Relations as a field is the study of interactions between countries. Over time, international relations scholars have developed theories or frameworks for understanding the things they observe in real life. But these theories are only significant if they can explain the actual events that occur in international relations. As a result, the course will explore both theory and how it applies to real world policy issues. Issues discussed include proliferations of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, free trade, US-Russia relations, Afghanistan, Arab-Israeli conflict, Latin America-US relations, global climate change among others current issues facing the United States in its interactions with the rest of the world.
This class meets four days a week.

AP COMPARATIVE POLITICS [565]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester elective provides an intensive study of institutions, political and social structures, populations, beliefs, and ideas that constitute political life and activity in six exemplary countries, including Great Britain, Iran, Russia, China, Nigeria and Mexico. Students will master the comparative method of political analysis that will enable them to uncover fundamental principles of political organization through comparison of political systems. The course will also explore differences in political institutions, regime types as well as economic systems.
This class meets four days a week.

SLAVERY, CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION [574]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: This one semester course is an in-depth examination of the critical challenge of 19th century America, the attempt to resolve those seemingly intractable issues of slavery, race, the Constitution, and the meanings of freedom and democracy as they evolved in American development. Specifically, the course will examine the origins of American slavery, the role slavery played in colonial development, and how slavery became a part of the U.S. Constitution. It will also study the emergence of the anti-slavery and abolition movements. The development of sectionalism and its relationship to slavery will be explored, and then the causes of the Civil War. The course will then explore the Civil War, chronicling the gradual development of Union power leading to the Northern victory. The course will then examine the tragedy of Reconstruction, the attempts to reunify the nation and resolve the racial divide, and the reemergence of white supremacy through brute force and loss of national will.
This class meets four days a week.

CIVIL RIGHTS, THE GREAT SOCIETY AND VIETNAM: THE TUMULTUOUS YEARS [578]

Credit: 0.50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites:
Senior status

Description: This one semester course attempts an in-depth examination of the tumultuous years of the last half of the 20th century in America. Starting with a brief examination of American society in 1950, the course will study the Civil Rights Movement through the 50s, 60s and into the 70s. It will also trace the emergence of the Great Society programs of the 60s, the beginnings of the Vietnam War and the gradual escalation of American involvement, and the rise of the anti-war and counterculture movements. The pivotal year of 1968 will draw special attention, and the course will conclude with the developments of the early 70s and the end of the Nixon presidency.
This class meets four days a week

THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA [575]

Credit: .50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The world is growing increasingly smaller yet China is too often portrayed in the West as a faraway and exotic land with an incomprehensible history and veiled intentions. The reality is that for most of its 5,000-year existence, China has been the largest, most populous, wealthiest, and mightiest nation on Earth. Certainly, China is a country of contradictions and transitions: a peasant society with some of the world's most futuristic cities, an ancient civilization that is modernizing at tremendous rate, a walled-off nation that is increasingly at the center of world trade. As China continues to transform itself into a modern superpower it is essential to understand where China has been in order to anticipate its future. This course delivers a social, economic and political overview of one of the most fascinating and complex countries in world history.
This course meets 4 days a week

POST 9/11 AND THE NEW MIDDLE EAST [579]

Credit: .50 (Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: 9/11/01 changed both the United States and the Middle East dramatically. Most Americans were confronted, for the first time, with groups called “Taliban” and “Al Qaeda”. The USA’s retaliatory invasions of Afghanistan and of Iraq spawned the rise of ISIS and Jabhat al-Nusra. Libya, Nigeria, and Yemen now struggle with radicalization. The Islamic State’s influence in Syria and Iraq has alarmed Washington DC and necessitated significant policy changes in accord with Western allies. The implications of continuing conflict are profound for the United States, its allies, and for the Middle East. This course is designed to aid the student in understanding the rise of 21st century Middle East extremism, the (often conflicting) goals of its numerous players, the likely targets of jihad¬ist movements, and the possibility of achieving stability in the Middle East.
This course meets 4 days a week

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY [583]

Credit: 1.0 (Year-long Senior Choice Course)
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: AP European History is a survey course that follows the overall scope, sequence and format of the College Board’s AP European History Course Description in preparing students for the AP Exam of the same name. The course focuses on developing students' understanding of European history from approximately 1450 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of European history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods. Also, students develop the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past.
This is a year-long choice course; it will meet 4 days a week during both the Fall and Spring semesters.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT [600]

The four year Math requirement may be fulfilled with courses listed in this section. All students must receive credit for Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. All courses require a graphing calculator. Incoming freshmen will be placed in honors or advanced level math classes based on their performance on the ISEE Admissions Exam and the Jesuit Algebra Skills Assessment Exam. Transfer students will be placed in an appropriate level math class based on their previous transcript and performance on the appropriate level placement exam.

HONORS ALGEBRA 1 [611]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Scores above the 85%ile on both the Math Achievement and Quantitative Aptitude portions of the entrance exam or comparable score on the Algebra Skills Assessment.

Description: Topics covered are the same as Algebra 1. Differences include time allotted each section, types of presentations, depth of understanding for some concepts, extended use of graphing calculators and more challenging tests and quizzes. Honors students are expected to finish the course with a more in depth understanding and the ability to be more independent in dealing with new material.

ALGEBRA 1 [612]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: None

Description: The first year Algebra course is designed to provide a link between the mathematics which students have already studied and the mathematics courses which they will study in their high school years. Topics include a brief review of algebraic terms, simple equations, and real numbers; other topics concern solving equations, problem solving, factoring, linear systems, functions, inequalities, rational numbers, quadratic functions, and the graphing of linear and quadratic functions both with and without a graphing calculator.

HONORS ADVANCED ALGEBRA 1 [619]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the Jesuit Algebra Skills Assessment Exam and scores above the 85%ile on both the Math Achievement and Quantitative Aptitude portions of the entrance exam.

Description: The course is intended for the incoming freshman who has considerable facility with but not mastery of Algebra I. Topics covered include advanced topics in Algebra I such as rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and introduction to functions with an emphasis on quadratics combined with Algebra II topics of higher degree polynomials, advanced factoring, non-linear systems of equations, and matrix operations.

HONORS GEOMETRY [621]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1. Students must have a second semester average of at least 85% in Honors Algebra 1, 95% in Algebra 1, or 82% in Honors Advanced Algebra I and the teacher’s recommendation. For incoming freshmen, scores above the 85%ile on both the Math Achievement and Quantitative Aptitude portions of the ISEE and evidence of advanced knowledge of algebra topics as determined by performance on the Jesuit Algebra Skills Assessment Exam.

Description: This course covers all the topics of Geometry but from an approach heavily centered on the development and use of deductive reasoning. Students are expected to develop conjectures related to the various topics and to prove the same as theorems before using them in related exercises.

GEOMETRY [622]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and sophomore standing

Description: This course develops the thinking skills of the students. These skills are: reasoning, analysis, interpreting, recall and transfer, classification, spatial perception, synthesis, and application of concepts. The course emphasizes proof and problem solving. Content areas include properties of triangles, polygons and circles, similarity, trigonometry, areas of plane figures, and surface areas and volumes of solids, and constructions of figures. Coordinate and transformational approaches to geometry are also taught.

HONORS ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY [631]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Second semester average of at least 90% in Geometry or 80% in Honors Geometry as well as second semester averages of at least 85% for Honors Algebra 1 or 90% for Algebra 1 and the current teacher’s recommendation. A student who completed Honors Advanced Algebra I may enroll in Honors Algebra 2/Trig with a second semester average of at least 85% in any Geometry course.

Description: In addition to the topics covered in Algebra 2 the course also includes trigonometry. Assignments and tests include more challenging problems and more creative solution techniques.

ALGEBRA 2 [632]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry

Description: Topics include solution techniques for a variety of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities and systems, using both algebraic analysis and matrix algebra on the graphing calculator. This is to be followed by analysis and simplification of exponential, logarithmic, rational, polynomial (including those of degree 3 and greater) and irrational functions. Finally the set of complex numbers, the conic sections, series and sequences and probability and statistics are introduced. Students are encouraged to develop a diverse set of problem solving skills, including technological approaches, through work on numerous application problems in each section.

HONORS ADVANCED ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY [639]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior Standing and at least 85% in Honors Advanced Algebra I, 93% in Honors Algebra I or 95% in Algebra I together with at least 85% in second semester Honors Geometry and the current teacher’s recommendation. Students with at least 95% in second semester Geometry may be considered for this course on an individual basis.

Description: This course is designed as preparation for a level of AP Calculus in the student’s senior year. In addition to the topics covered in Algebra 2 the course also includes trigonometry, as well topics from Precalculus of function analysis, mathematical induction, sequences, series, and limits. Assignments and tests include more challenging problems and more creative solution techniques.

AP STATISTICS [657]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Geometry. Students must have a GPA above 85.0 and second semester averages of 70% in Honors Precalculus, 75% in either Honors Algebra 2 or Precalculus, or 80% in Algebra 2.

Description: This course may be taken following Precalculus, concurrently with Calculus, or concurrently with Precalculus. The focus of the course is preparation for successful completion of the AP Statistics Exam. Topics are similar to those for Statistics with emphasis on those topics listed by the College Board.
This class meets four days a week.

STATISTICS [658]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Geometry. Second semester averages of 75% in Algebra 2, 70% in Honors Algebra 2, or 70% in Precalculus. This course can be taken concurrently with or following Precalculus.

Description: Topics include statistics, experimental design, data de the role of analysis, basic probability and probability distributions including binomial, geometric, Poisson, Chi-square and normal, sampling variability and distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of bivariate data, and linear regressions.
This class meets four days a week.

HONORS PRECALCULUS [665]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of Geometry, Algebra 2. Students must have a second semester average of 85% in Honors Algebra 2/ trigonometry or 95% in Algebra 2 and the teachers’ recommendation.

Description: This course is designed as preparation for the BC level of AP Calculus in the student’s senior year. In addition to the topics of Precalculus, this course includes mathematical induction, sequences and series, limits, and polar and parametric function representation.
This class meets five days a week.

HONORS PRECALCULUS [667]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2. Students must have a second semester average of 85% in Honors Algebra 2/trigonometry or 95% in Algebra 2 and the teachers’ recommendation.

Description: This course is designed as preparation for a rigorous course in Calculus. In addition to the topics of Precalculus, this course includes mathematical induction, sequences, series, limits, limits of functions, and an introduction to the derivative and its applications.
This class meets four days a week.

PRECALCULUS [668]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. Second semester averages of at least 75% in Honors Algebra 2 or 80% in Algebra 2.

Description: The main objective of this course is to build a solid mathematical foundation in preparation for the student’s entry into college level courses. The course emphasizes the study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their applications; complex numbers are also studied. The emphasis will be on function analysis, mathematical reasoning and problem solving using appropriate current technology.
This class meets four days a week.

AP BC CALCULUS [677]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Geometry, Precalculus. Students must have a second semester average of at least 85% in Honors Precalculus or 95% in Precalculus and the teacher’s recommendation.

Description: The focus of the course is preparation for successful completion of the AP BC Calculus Exam. Topics are presented using graphical, numerical, algebraic, and verbal approaches with an emphasis on the use of appropriate technology. Students who successfully complete this course and the AP exam may qualify to earn credit and/or placement at most colleges and universities.
This class meets five days a week.

AP AB CALCULUS [678]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Geometry; one of the following must be true: 1. Honors Precalculus students: a second semester average of at least 75% and the teacher’s recommendation; 2. Precalculus students: a second semester average of at least 80% and the teacher’s recommendation.

Description: This is an introductory course in differential and integral Calculus with elementary functions. The focus of the course is preparation for successful completion of the AP AB Calculus Exam. Definitions and theorems are precisely stated; proofs of theorems are often deferred to a later course. Topics are presented using graphical, numerical, algebraic, and verbal approaches with an emphasis on the use of appropriate technology. Students who successfully complete this course and the AP exam may qualify to earn credit and/or placement at most colleges and universities.
This class meets four days a week.

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT [700]

The four credit Science requirement must include Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

PRE-AP BIOLOGY [711]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Student achievement of better than the 80%ile on the Reading Comprehension and Verbal Aptitude portions of the entrance exam.

Description: This course covers the same material presented in Biology, but in greater depth. Testing in Honors Biology includes a larger number of application questions on tests and on homework.

BIOLOGY [712]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: None

Description: This course entails the study of molecules, cells, genetics, evolution, microbiology, botany, invertebrates, vertebrates, human biology and ecology. In order to understand the application of these concepts, presentations are made to the students using graphic animations and computer presentations. Students are required to have lab on these topics once a week.

AP BIOLOGY [717]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Senior status; 90 cumulative GPA and above. Some students will be expected to take the AP Biology exam.

Description: This course is taught at the same level of a major‘s class during the first year of college. All of the same topics are covered that are covered in the Introductory Biology course but to a greater depth. Some of the topics that are investigated at this level are cellular respiration, photosynthesis, Mendelian and biochemical genetics, and evolution. Since this class is taught at the college level, grades are derived from tests, essays, readings, and labs. This is a dual enrollment course with Brookhaven College, upon completion of course, students will receive 8 hours of Major’s Biology credit.
This class meets five days a week.

PRE-AP CHEMISTRY [723]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status; 93% cumulative GPA plus 90% average or better in second semester Algebra 1 or 85% average or better in Honors Algebra 1, Honors Geometry or Geometry.

Description: This honors chemistry course examines several fundamental topics in chemistry in greater detail than the regular chemistry course, providing a thorough preparation for the Advanced Placement Chemistry course. Students are expected to consult outside sources and integrate current events with the material from the textbook and class discussion. Students learn to apply the principles of chemistry in order to make well-reasoned predictions, develop and perform laboratory experiments, and support scientific conclusions through calculation. Topics discussed in the first semester include: scientific measurement, atomic theory, nuclear chemistry, the periodic table, bonding, nomenclature, reaction types, and stoichiometric calculations. Building upon the foundation of the first semester, in the second semester we consider each of the following: gas laws, solutions, thermochemistry and reaction kinetics, acid-base chemistry, chemical equilibria, and oxidation-reduction reactions. The long-term project for this course involves researching a chemical compound and constructing a molecular model to be presented during the spring semester.

CHEMISTRY [724]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Sophomore status

Description: This is an introductory chemistry course. Topics covered include such concepts as the writing and balancing chemical equations, chemical reactions, calculations involving chemical quantities, electron energy levels, bonding and periodicity. Properties of matter, thermochemistry, acid-base reactions, and chemical equilibria are also explored. Frequent laboratory experiments reinforce what is learned in lecture and small-group work. The major project involves researching a chemical compound and constructing a molecular model to be presented during the spring semester. The primary goal of the course is to empower students to become creative thinkers and problem solvers through the understanding and application of chemistry concepts.

AP CHEMISTRY [727]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior* or Senior status with a 93% cumulative GPA, completion or concurrent enrollment in Pre- Calculus or higher level math. Students who do not meet these requirements may speak to the course instructor about possible enrollment. Students will be expected to take the AP Chemistry exam. *Juniors must also enroll in a Physics course either their Junior or Senior year to fulfill graduation requirements.

Description: The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as freshmen, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in other fields where general chemistry is the prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. Students in this course should attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course should contribute to the development of the student‘s abilities to think clearly and to express his ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. This college course in general chemistry differs qualitatively from the usual first secondary school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of textbook (college level), the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by the students. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and the variety of experiments done in the laboratory.
This class meets five days a week.

AP PHYSICS 1 [734]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: This two semester course is open to junior and senior students. Juniors must have a cumulative 90% GPA and a 90% average in regular Math courses or 85% average in honors Math courses. Seniors must have a cumulative 90% GPA and a 90% average in regular Math courses or an 85% average in honors Math courses. Concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra II is required. Students enrolling are required to take the AP Physics 1 exam at the end of the spring semester.

Description: This course provides a systematic development of the principles of physics by emphasizing problem solving and helping students develop a deep understanding of physics through conceptual and quantitative aspects utilizing interactive lectures, demonstrations, videos, and laboratory experiences. Topics covered include Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.
This class meets five times a week.

AP PHYSICS 2 [738]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: This two-semester course is open to seniors. Seniors must have a cumulative 90% GPA and a 90% average in regular Math courses or an 85% average in honors Math courses. Seniors must be enrolled in Pre-calculus, Honors Pre-calculus, or higher Math level. Students must have also completed AP Physics 1 or have teacher recommendation. Students enrolling are required to take the AP Physics 2 exam at the end of the spring semester.

Description: This course provides a systematic development of the principles of physics by emphasizing problem solving and helping students develop a deep understanding of physics through conceptual and quantitative aspects utilizing interactive lectures, demonstrations, videos, and laboratory experiences. Topics covered include fluid mechanics, thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics.
This class meets four times a week.

PHYSICS [736]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Junior status

Description: Utilizing open formatted labs and project based learning, this introductory Physics course emphasizes independent thought and investigation of issues with real-world applications. Students will make judgments and interpret information while forming their own unique solutions. The course integrates concepts from the following topics: one and two dimensional motion, Newton‘s Laws, forces, energy, waves, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Both conceptual and quantitative aspects of the material will be covered. Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of the concepts through several projects.

AP PHYSICS C MECHANICS AND ELECTROMAGNETISM [737, 739]

Credit: 2.00
Prerequisite: This double period, two semester course is open to seniors who have completed AP Physics 1 or regular physics/ AP Chemistry with current science teacher and AP Physics C instructor approval. Concurrent enrollment in Calculus is required. Students are expected to take both the AP Mechanics and Electromagnetism tests at the end of the spring semester.

Description: This course corresponds to the first year college course taken by students majoring in engineering or physics, with a separate laboratory and lecture component. Students who plan on studying engineering or physics in university are strongly recommended to take this course. This course is taught by two instructors.
This course meets 4 days a week, 2 periods per day.

AP Environmental Science [762]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: This two-semester course is open to Seniors

Description: The Advanced Placement Environmental Science course is designed to aid students in exploring the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires students to identify and analyze natural and anthropogenic (human-made) environmental problems as well as solutions for evaluating those problems. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; including topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry and geography.
Advanced Placement Environmental Science will fulfill students interests in that student have demonstrated interests in various topics presented. For example, student who have participated in the marine biology trip may find additional interest in the aquatic ecology unit. Additionally, there are several bridges to the engineering curriculum in the third rock from the sun, biodiversity, nonrenewable and renewable energy units.
This class meets four days a week.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY [745]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: This two semester course is open to Seniors

Description: This class will introduce students to the anatomical structures and the physiological processes that make human life possible. Topics include: levels of organization in the human body, all of the human body systems (skeletal, muscular, and reproductive), metabolism and energy transfer, development and inheritance and medical terminology. Several human systems will be studied in fetal pigs. This class is designed for students who are interested in health sciences such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, physical /occupational therapy, sports medicine, athletic training, exercise physiology, and general fitness. This class is taught at the same level as an entry level college course, therefore expectations are that students will ascribe to mature behavior. Grades are derived from tests, essays, and readings.
This class meets four days a week.

FORENSIC SCIENCE [750]

Credit: 0.50
Description: Forensic Science is a one-semester course based on college level introductory criminalistics. It is designed to introduce evidence analysis, data collection and advanced scientific methods for the application of science to law. Forensic Science will focus on crime-scene techniques and applications including data collection and collation, processing of trace evidence, and how to present findings. This course will also focus on specialized lab based techniques and applications including chemical detection, how to process biological and chemical evidence and how to generate a scientific report.
Tentative Field Trips: UNT Forensic Science Dept, Dallas Police Dept., Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. The main goal of the course is to understand how precepts of biology, chemistry and physics are used in the processing of crime scenes and to apply that knowledge to collect evidence, analyze data, present findings and defend a conclusion.
This class meets four days a week.

ENGINEERING ACE [753]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: This one semester course is open to Seniors

Description: Engineering ACE is a one-semester introduction to engineering with a business perspective. Students design, test, optimize, and market products over the course of the semester. The course focuses primarily on aeronautics, electrical, and civil engineering. Students will strengthen understanding of concepts using hands on labs and industry standard software. Central concepts are reinforced through design challenges including earthquake proof sky scrapers, gliders, soldering labs, and virtual instrument constructions. In addition, students will participate in site visits to various industries, engineering firms, or lectures with experts in the field. The goal of the course is to gain an understanding of how components of our world function and interact as well as the impact of engineering on daily life.
This class meets four days a week.

ENGINEERING PMM [754]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: This one semester course is open to Seniors

Description: Engineering PMM is a one-semester course which explores some of the most dynamics topics in engineering today. Throughout the course, students probe underlying issues to complex problems including the global energy crisis, public policy as it relates to advancements in medical research, and the impact of emerging technologies on various economies. In addition, students will strengthen their leadership, communication, and team work through project designs, rapid prototyping, and research presentations. This course challenges students to look for positive contributions they can make to the global community. Focusing on biomedical, petroleum, and mechanical engineering, key understandings will be reinforced through robot challenges, gel electrophoresis labs, solar car construction, and hydraulic arm challenges. In addition, students will participate in site visits to various industries, engineering firms, or lectures with experts in the field.
This class meets four days a week.

Marine Biology 1 [752]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed regular or honors chemistry before participating in this course.

Description: In partnership with Dive British Virgin Islands and Project Aware, students will engage in discussions about research techniques and validity, human impacts on coral reefs and Caribbean marine ecosystems, fish identification and anatomy, and the application of science. This course is hands-on and will include research projects, video diaries, blog submissions, and group activities. It will incorporate content and understandings from previous science experiences. This summer-only course will take place on the Jesuit Dallas campus and Virgin Gorda, British Virgin Islands. Additional tuition and fees required.
Additional tuition and fees required.
Number of students is limited.

Marine Biology 2 [753]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Marine Biology 1 before participating in this course.

Description: In partnership with Dive British Virgin Islands, students will advance their understandings of research techniques and human impacts on Caribbean ecosystems. This course is hands-on and will include research projects, video diaries, blog submissions, and group activities. Students will direct a research project that involves species present on various islands in the BVI. This summer-only course will take place on the Jesuit Dallas campus and Virgin Gorda, British Virgin Islands. Additional tuition and fees required.
Additional tuition and fees required.
Number of students is limited.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT [800]

One credit of Computer Science is required for graduation.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING [813]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: None

Description: All freshmen must take Introduction to Computer Programming. Intro to Computer Programming assumes no prior computer programming experience. Students will learn algorithm development and an Object Oriented approach to problem solving. The programming language will be Java.
This class meets five days a week.

PROGRAMMING 2 [843]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Introduction to Programming

Description: This course affords students an opportunity to use skills acquired in Introduction to Programming to create an interactive application. Graphical User Interface (GUI) development is combined with principles of object oriented design in order to develop programmatic solutions to problems. The course culminates with a project where students design and develop a functioning application.
This class meets four days a week.

HONORS ADVANCED JAVA [844]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: 90% or above in Intro. to Programming

Description: The syllabus emphasizes problem solving, algorithm development, data structures, Java programming, and Object Oriented Design. This course stresses programming fundamentals over GUI development. Honors Advanced Java is required for those who wish to take AP Computer Science.
This class meets four days a week.

WEB DEVELOPMENT [873]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: 85% or above in Intro. to Programming

Description: This course affords students an opportunity to use skills acquired in Introduction to Programming to create an interactive web application. HTML, CSS and JavaScript are combined with principles of object oriented programming in order to solve real world problems. The course culminates with a project where students design and develop a functioning web application.
This class meets four days a week.

VISUAL BASIC .NET [883]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: 85% or above in Intro. to Programming

Description: Students will continue their object oriented foundations via video game models, examples, exercises and projects. The course culminates with students planning, coding, testing and playing their own video game. Visual Basic .NET is the programming platform. The nature of the course requires students to implement collision detection algorithms and basic physics concepts. Basic algebra skills are helpful but not required. The software for this course can only be installed on a machine running a Windows operating system.
This class meets four days a week.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE [845]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Honors Advanced Java or teacher recommendation.

Description: This semester course prepares the student to take the AP Computer Science A exam by building on skills acquired in Introduction to Programming and Honors Advanced Java. The syllabus emphasizes problem solving, algorithm development, data structures, Java programming, and Object Oriented Programming. Students interested in the course are encouraged to consult the instructor. Detailed information about the AP Computer Science test is available at: www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html.
This class meets four days a week.

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FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT [900]

One credit (1.00) is required in the Fine Arts for graduation. A student enrolled in Band or Chamber Orchestra for at least two years fulfills the requirement. All students must complete their initial ½ credit before the beginning of their junior year. Students may complete these requirements in summer school, if the course is offered, before or after their sophomore year.

THEATER ARTS [910]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: open to all students

Description: Taking this class means being on your feet. You will perform improvisational games, give a monologue, work as a team to build a scene, draw basic stage design, and learn how to direct. The class aims to give the student a broad introduction to what is a very diverse art form. In each new unit, we will also examine historical antecedents and give a basic review of relevant theory.

THEATER DIRECTING [914]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: Everyone is invited to consider this course, not just students who are actors. Indeed, one of the first lessons of this course is that acting and directing are two very different skills. We will start by covering the basic theory of performance and direction, and then move into a workshop setting in which students apply their skills. The class then allows students to demonstrate their learning in a real-world environment, with a real cast, a real show, and a real audience.
This class meets four days a week.

STAGECRAFT [916]

Credit: 0.50

Description: Power tools, construction, and design are at the heart of this course. Students will construct the stage for Jesuit Theater’s extracurricular play. However, no extracurricular commitment is required, and no theater experience is necessary. All construction will be done in class. During the course of study, students will learn the skills needed to construct scenery, hang and focus lighting instruments, implement a sound system for effects, and scenic artistry, all in a variety of techniques. Additionally, students will be introduced to basic design theory, and will be given an opportunity to draft their own designs for a theatrical production.
This class meets four days a week.

FILMMAKING [918]

Credit: 0.50

Description: Movies. Television. YouTube. Take this class and learn the basics of telling stories through digital video, which includes cinematography, directing, sound design, lighting, and editing. The course will explore the tools of filmmaking in depth and culminate in a short film that will debut for audiences in the spring. Students will work with partners on the film and should be prepared to spend time outside of class to shoot, edit, and polish productions. To register for the course, first gain permission from Mr. Myers via email or an appointment during office hours.
This class meets four days a week.

CERAMICS - THROWING [922]

Credit: 0.50

Description: This course focuses on pottery making by mainly use of the potter’s wheel.
Potters, sculptors, hand builders and all handmade ceramic artisans learn these basic techniques to work with clay. It includes pinch, coil, slab, extrusions, sculptural as well as wheel throwing and trimming methods to working with clay. Basic surface decoration, glazing and firing techniques and kiln operation are covered. Focus is to experience different techniques and to become competent and knowledgeable of different ways to work with clay; competence comes with practice.

CERAMICS - HAND-BUILDING [924]

Credit: 0.50

Description: This course focuses on pottery making by mainly using Hand-building, and not working on the potter’s wheel.
Potters, sculptors, hand builders and all handmade ceramic artisans learn these basic techniques to work with clay. It includes pinch, coil, slab, extrusions, and sculptural methods to work with clay. Basic surface decoration, glazing and firing techniques and kiln operation are covered. Focus is to experience different techniques and to become competent Hand-built clay objects; competence comes with practice.

ADVANCED CERAMICS [929]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Ceramics – (Throwing or Hand-Building).

Description: This course focuses on pottery making by Throwing or Hand-building technique.
The focus will be determined by the student’s interest and agreement with the instructor.
Potters, sculptors, hand builders and all handmade ceramic artisans build upon throwing or hand-building techniques to work with clay; by expanding competency and studying the important elements of designing and producing utilitarian and contemporary pottery, including wall thickness, balance and proportion, surface decoration and glazing and firing techniques. Competence comes with practice.

ART SURVEY [931]

Credit: 0.50

Description: Students in this summer-only course will discover the visual elements of art through in-class exercises and field trips to local professional arts establishments. The course culminates in a comprehensive project in which students imitate the artistic exercises of advertising, architecture, theater, or gallery management.

DRAWING [935]

Credit: 0.50

Description: A one semester course for students with previous art/drawing experience and/or a serious interest in developing their art through focused drawing instruction.

2D DESIGN: TRADITIONAL MEDIA [945]

Credit: 0.50

Description: A one-semester course for students interested in developing their art through traditional media: illustration, printmaking and painting. This class is open to all grade levels.
This class will meet 4 days per week.

2D DESIGN: DIGITAL MEDIA [942]

Credit: 0.50

Description: A one-semester course for students interested in developing their art through new media: digital imagery and the Adobe Creative Suite. This class is open to all grade levels.
This class will meet 4 days per week.

AP DRAWING PORTFOLIO [947]

AP 2D DESIGN PORTFOLIO [949]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

Description: A yearlong course designed to assist in the development of a serious portfolio of work for art-focused students. Students will work with a variety of media to develop projects, which will culminate in a comprehensive portfolio to be submitted for review by the College Board in May. This class will not meet during periods. Instead, students will complete work either before school, after school, or during free periods.

MUSIC COMPOSITION AND FILM SCORING [917]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: None

Description: Students will learn the basic fundamentals of music composition and film scoring. Using Logic Pro software on the iMacs, students will learn fundamentals of rhythm, melody, harmony, and sound manipulation. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.
This class meets four days a week.

MUSIC APPRECIATION [951]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Status. Director Approval.

Description: This a summer-school only course and is a basic survey of music including music notation, listening skills, and history. Styles of music to be covered: Classical, jazz, pop, and rock.
This class meets four days a week.

MUSIC THEORY [952]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Must be able to demonstrate proficiency in reading music and playing an instrument

Description: An in-depth study of music theory, ear training, counterpoint, keyboard harmony, and analysis of both classical and contemporary musical forms.

ADVANCED MUSICIANSHIP [953]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Must be able to demonstrate proficiency in reading music and playing an instrument

Description: An in-depth study of music theory, ear training, counterpoint, keyboard harmony, and analysis of both classical and contemporary musical forms.

INTRODUCTION TO JAZZ HISTORY AND IMPROVISATION I [955]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: This class is a precursor to Jazz Improvisation 956 and requires minimal proficiency on a musical instrument. Audition required.p>

Description: A class which explores the basic techniques used in improvising and performing jazz music. Chord structure, scales, and melodic construction are covered. Students will focus on learning to read music, jazz history, music theory, and ultimately playing improvised music.
This class meets four days a week.

JAZZ HISTORY AND IMPROVISATION 2 [956]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Completion of Introduction to Jazz History and Improvisation I. Must be able to read music and demonstrate proficiency on an instrument. Audition required.

Description: This class continues to explore intermediate to advanced techniques used in improvising and performing jazz music. Further examination of jazz history including famous musical performances and theory will also be covered.
This class meets four days a week.

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA [957]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Junior high string orchestra or audition.

Description: Class is the traditional string orchestra (violin, viola, cello, bass and piano). Music ranging from Baroque Era to the 20th century is covered. This 2 semester class meets twice a week at Ursuline Academy.
Exempt from Credit Maximum

MEN'S CHORUS [961]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Must be interested in learning to sing music of all styles.

Description: Students will learn to sing and harmonize music from traditional genres as well as pop, rock and jazz. Students will have opportunities to develop their musical potential through learning techniques such as reading music, harmonizing, and group and solo performance skills.
Exempt from Credit Maximum

FRESHMAN MEN'S CHORUS [962]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Must be interested in learning to sing music of all styles.

Description: SStudents will learn to sing and harmonize music from traditional genres as well as pop, rock and jazz. Students will have opportunities to develop their musical potential through learning techniques such as reading music, harmonizing, and group and solo performance skills.
Exempt from Credit Maximum
This class meets twice per week during Freshman Lunch, concurrently with Men’s Chorus [961].
Freshman Students will eat their lunch in the choir hall during the first half of lunch and sing during the second half. Additional rehearsals outside of school will be scheduled for concerts and school masses.

BAND [970]

Credit: 1.00
Prerequisites: Must either play an instrument or be willing to learn.

Description: Class composed of wind and percussion musicians. The organization performs as a marching band August through mid-November. It is a Concert band for the rest of the year, which includes percussion ensemble, jazz band, and chamber music. Students without an instrument will be provided with a school-owned instrument.

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COMMUNITY SERVICE [990]

COMMUNITY SERVICE [998]

Credit: 100 hours
Prerequisites: Senior status

Description: The Jesuit Community Service program seeks to provide an experience for the Jesuit student which will enable him to achieve considerable knowledge of the many needs of local and wider communities. The program seeks to prepare him for the day when he will take a place in these communities as a competent, concerned, and responsible member. The Community Service requirement of one hundred hours encourages the Jesuit senior to be a man of action, confronting issues in the community and striving to build the Kingdom of God on Earth. On a weekly basis the Jesuit seniors serve over 87 different agencies in the Dallas / Ft. Worth Metroplex. In addition to this regular weekly service, the seniors undertake a multitude of special projects working in diverse areas of need throughout the community and generously devoting many hours of volunteer service.

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND PUBLIC POLICY [995]

Credit: 0.50
Prerequisites: Senior status; concurrent enrollment in Community Service.

Description: This course offers seniors the opportunity to explore the historical development and application of Catholic Social Teaching.
The course is supplemented with personal reflections that relate to the senior’s specific community service site and the relationship their work and these agencies have in building a better world. During the course, students delve more deeply into a wide range of social justice themes that integrate their more theoretical learning with their specific area of senior community service. The course is founded on the principals of Social Justice thought in the Jesuit tradition. Topics include: poverty, legal systems, childhood education, special education, immigration, elder care, human dignity, homelessness, just war, health care, and modern social structures. This class meets once a week, attends guest speaker presentations, and culminates with a Capstone Project.

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